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Brown University


Job Details  

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Before we can allow you to see the details of an off-campus job, you must agree to the disclaimer below. You will only have to do this once per time you use this site. Read the disclaimer below, and if you agree to the terms, press the "I agree" button. You will then see the job details. Otherwise, click on "new search".

Brown University and the Student Employment Office is not responsible for the safety, wages, working conditions or other aspects of the off-campus employment. The University does not screen employers who post job opportunities at the Student Employment Office, and by posting jobs Brown University and the Student Employment Office does not make any representation as to the working conditions that may exist at any place of employment. Use of this system shall be entirely at the risk of the users hereof and the University expressly disclaims any and all liability with respect thereto.

It is the responsibility of the student to research the integrity of the organizations to which they are applying. The student is advised to use caution and common sense when applying for any position with an organization, or private party. Do not put yourself in a vulnerable situation. Even the best job opportunity is not worth jeopardizing your personal safety.

Tips

1. Don’t "over share" it: Social media is increasingly popular, but it's a good idea to keep personal information private. Fraudsters can use personal information to help gain access to an account. Also, it's a good idea to keep other information private, such as mobile and home phone numbers; email address; and dorm, apartment and home addresses. NOTE: When applying for jobs off-campus, create an email account just for this purpose.

2. Doubt it: Use a healthy dose of skepticism if someone — claiming to be from a legitimate company — calls, texts or sends an email asking for personal information. Never give out your personal information until you have done your due diligence. No legitimate employer will ask you for personal information unless you have met in-person, and they have hired you to work for them.

3. Meeting a Prospective Employer: You should always meet prospective employers at a neutral location. If this is a company, then the meeting should be at their office. If you are meeting a private party, then the meeting should be in a public place where you feel comfortable.

4. Receiving Compensation: Compensation is typically given for services rendered. If you have not met or have not yet begun working for an employer, you should not be receiving compensation.

5. Depositing Checks from Your Employer: If you have begun working for a new employer, and they pay you via check, it’s a good idea to wait for the check to clear your account before you spend the money. Many banks allow you to see the money – and spend it – before they have actually cleared the check. This can cause you to incur high overdraft fees if the check were to “bounce”.

6. Personal Safety: It’s always a good idea to share your work schedule with someone you know and trust. If you are working for a private party, be sure that someone knows the address, days and hours you are working.